Military and Police

‘Indivisible’ Movie Tells Story of Faith and Family in the Military

Another military movie has hit the theaters, but this one goes beyond the expected action sequences and sweeping, slow-motion scenes. “Indivisible” tells the true story of Darren Turner, an Army Chaplain, and his wife, Heather. As a new Army Chaplain, Turner is faced with a deployment to Iraq, while his wife and family are faced with adjusting to military life in a new home without him.

Through the course of the film, every soldier and family member is tested. The movie highlights their religious faith as a force to help them overcome obstacles. The relationship between Darren and Heather Turner is reminiscent of what so many military couples face. Following Turner’s return home, they “must decide if they’re willing to face one more battle: the fight to save their marriage.”

The movie is based on a true story about an actual military couple. Darren and Heather Turner say that they are “honored and humbled that our story has become this powerful new movie that celebrates marriage, military service, faith, family, sacrifice, and forgiveness.” In addition to glowing reviews and links to show times, the movie’s website includes resources for couples who are interested in examining lessons from the movie about family and faith.

“We encourage you to explore the organizations, initiatives, and ministries that support the military in your local community and nationally that do great things for our military men and women and their families,” they said. Links are provided to The Rick Herrema Foundation, Operation Heal Our Patriots, The Fisher House Foundation, and The 5 Love Languages: Military Edition, among others. A novel and devotional based on the movie are also available.

A Warm Reception

Critics on Rotten Tomatoes gives “Indivisible” a 69 percent approval, with 93 percent of audience raters liking the movie. The movie came to theaters on October 26. The reception so far has been positive, although with its heavy faith influence, the film does not appeal to all movie-goers.

Some critics found the faith aspect of the film unexpected to see at the movie theater. “It would be more at home in the rec rooms of churches than in movie theaters,” said John DeFore of the Hollywood Reporter.

Many enjoyed the focus on the family aspect of military life at home. Katie Walsh of the Los Angeles Times called the film “refreshing…in the way it balances the narratives of the troops at war and the family members who stay at home.” War movies often revolve around the bonds created on the battlefield. They are powerful and make a great narrative arc in film. It is less common for a movie to give equal attention to the trials faced by military families and, most importantly, the work needed to bring the two back together.”

(Credit: www.indivisiblemovie.com)

“Indivisible” was the Audience Choice winner at the Heartland International Film Festival. It was also nominated for the Canadian International Faith & Family Film Festival, the El Dorado Film Festival, and won Best Drama at the Int’l Christian Film Festival.

The film is directed by David G. Evans (“The Grace Card”) and stars Justin Bruening (“Good Behavior,” “Grey’s Anatomy”) and Sarah Drew (“Radio,” “Moms’ Night Out,” “Grey’s Anatomy”).

The opinions expressed here by contributors are their own and are not the view of OpsLens which seeks to provide a platform for experience-driven commentary on today's trending headlines in the U.S. and around the world. Have a different opinion or something more to add on this topic? Contact us for guidelines on submitting your own experience-driven commentary.
Katie Begley

Katie Begley is a US Naval Academy graduate and former Surface Warfare Officer. In addition to being a military spouse, she is a freelance writer specializing in travel, education, and parenting subjects. Katie has worked in numerous communications roles for volunteer organizations and professionally for a local parenting magazine.

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