Politics

Hurricane Victim Cries Racism, Blames Government for Evacuating White People First

“The race baiters of St. Martin, in contrast, want a government inquiry, and they even complained that the news coverage focused more on the damage of white property compared to black property.”

In the Caribbean island of St. Martin, many of the black and mixed race inhabitants are complaining that white tourists were evacuated before they were. Johana Soudiagom was disturbed to realize she was one of the only dark-skinned people in her boat being moved to safety. She said, “That’s a way of saying, ‘I’m sorry, only whites.’ There are only whites on the boat.” She also claimed that French officials transported Americans while needy mothers were left behind. But this perception undermines the reality of the situation that determines why tourists were moved first, and it underscores the destructive and often selfish nature of victimology.

It might seem like skin color or wealth determined the government’s priorities. But tourists were given priority because of their vulnerability. The hotel with a picturesque view seems like a nice vacation spot until the hurricane causes 12-foot swells that destroy it. Tourists have fewer resources such as supplies of food and water, and they have little local knowledge of the area. As a result of those factors, they would be most vulnerable to a destructive event. In contrast, the locals know the terrain, live in houses farther away from danger areas, have their pantries to rely upon, and don’t have to worry about surviving a hurricane far away from home.

Really, this is just the latest round of victimization in the larger conversation. In liberal thought, the rich white people are often privileged at the expense of the poor and darker-skinned people. Even though there were good reasons to transfer the tourists first, it becomes another grievance. Americans were (largely) focusing on how people came together to help each other, such as JJ Watt raising millions of dollars or the stories of brave civilians taking their boats to help their neighbors.

In liberal thought, the rich white people are often privileged at the expense of the poor and darker-skinned people.

The race baiters of St. Martin, in contrast, want a government inquiry, and they even complained that the news coverage focused more on the damage of white property compared to black property. (Again, the white properties were likely closer to the beach, so instead of blaming racism you could probably blame overworked reporters under a tight deadline that had to get some quick footage as soon as they landed.)

The truth of the matter is that people see what they want to see. For example, Soudiagom said, “It was like a way of saying” the government only cared about white tourists. Those who feel like victims will attribute police and government actions and even the outcomes of their lives to some kind of cosmic injustice.

Those who aren’t obsessed with victimhood are willing to see the way people help each other, consider that there might be other reasons for government action, might understand that nobody can guarantee the same outcomes in life, and maybe they can stop complaining long enough to pitch in and help.

Morgan Deane

Morgan Deane is an OpsLens Contributor and a former U.S. Marine Corps infantry rifleman. Deane also served in the National Guard as an Intelligence Analyst. He is the author of the forthcoming book Decisive Battles in Chinese history, as well as Bleached Bones and Wicked Serpents: Ancient Warfare in the Book of Mormon.

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