Slideshow

Bad Boyz: 13 Cops Who Are Also World Class Fighters

With the explosion of popularity in mixed martial arts over the past decade thanks to the Ultimate Fighting Championship, willingly engaging in a petty street fight is crazier than ever. You just never know who you’re dealing with out there or what kind of training they might possess.  This poses a special kind of threat for police officers to face these days as getting those handcuffs around the wrists of a person trained in the art of dislocating joints and choking people to death can be a dicey proposition.  It’s a good thing our side has men and women like the ones in this fierce group of thirteen cops who also happen to be world class fighters.

Forrest Griffin

Before Conor Mcgregor, Brock Lesnar, or Rhonda Rousey, there was Forrest Griffin – who will forever be remembered as one of the UFC’s most colorful personalities.  Griffin may have reached the top of the mountain by defeating Quinton “Rampage” Jackson for the UFC Light Heavyweight title back in 2008, but perhaps his biggest contribution to the sport was made when he beat Stephan Bonnar in the finals of the inaugural season of The Ultimate Fighter back in 2005. UFC President Dana White calls it “the most important fight in UFC history” and many fans hold the opinion that it was the scrap that took the sport mainstream.

While anyone who recognizes the name knows of Forrest Griffin the fighter, many don’t realize he was a cop in Richmond County, Georgia for three years.  In fact, he had given up fighting and was a current LEO just before White fatefully talked him into making a last run at fighting and joining the inaugural TUF cast.  Check this out to see why Griffin made a much better fighter than a cop.  Still, it’s pretty damn funny.

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