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Refugee Resettlement Accelerates in President Obama’s Final Months

By Paul Bremmer, WND:

Through the first 11 weeks of fiscal year 2017, the United States welcomed 23,428 individuals as “refugees,” according to the Refugee Processing Center. At this rate, the U.S. will resettle roughly 110,580 this fiscal year, which would exceed President Obama’s target of 110,000.

Contrast that with last year, when the U.S. welcomed only 13,786 “refugees” through the first 11 weeks of FY 2016. The country would end up welcoming 84,995 by fiscal year’s end.

Leo Hohmann, a veteran journalist and WND news editor, sees this as part of a “concerted effort” by the Obama administration to admit as many as possible before Donald Trump becomes president.

“Get them here before Trump takes office on Jan. 20, because you don’t know exactly what Trump will do with regard to this controversial program,” is how Hohmann summarized the current administration’s attitude. “The left is in panic mode because this program has run on autopilot for 35 years, and now for the first time we have a president who has expressed an interest in taking a hard, critical look at how it is run and the effects it’s had on our cities, states and country.”

The program to which Hohmann refers is the U.S. State Department’s Refugee Admissions Program, which he writes about extensively in his brand-new book “Stealth Invasion: Muslim Conquest Through Immigration and the Resettlement Jihad.”

This program does not need to be renewed each year; it has run on autopilot since Congress passed and President Jimmy Carter signed the Refugee Act of 1980. However, the president has the authority to set an annual ceiling on the total number of refugees admitted

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